DN2M » Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is a devastating psychiatric disorder with a heterogeneous presentation. Its main clinical features include disorganized behaviours, positive, negative, affective and cognitive symptoms with different levels of prominence across time and across individuals. Schizophrenia concerns approximately 0.7% of the world's population, with a peak of onset in adolescence and young adulthood. During the past 20 years, schizophrenia pathophysiology an pathogenic issues have been revisited through the development of in-vivo structural and functional brain imaging techniques.

The main scientific objective of the Functional Neurosciences and Pathology Lab. is to identify the neural bases of Hallucinations and perceptual disorders, some of the most frequent and impairing symptoms of schizophrenia, using complementary strategies from eye-tracking to brain imaging. Our lab gathers scientists and physicians which allows to aggregate both etiological and therapeutic findings. Lab members are active members of national, European and world collaborative networks on these topics (e.g. the International Consortium on Hallucination Research...)

 

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FIGURE 1 : clusters of consistent activity among patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders experiencing auditory-verbal hallucinations were projected over a standardized template Greater likelihoods were measured within the left inferior parietal lobule (1), left hippocampus/para-hippocampal region (2), left superior temporal gyrus (3), Globus pallidum (4), Broca’s convolution (5), right anterior insula and frontal operculum (6). (L/R: left and right side of the brain).

From: Jardri R, Pouchet A, Pins D, Thomas P. Cortical activations during auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia: a coordinate-based meta-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;168(1):73-81

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FIGURE 2 :

a) Example of a hybrid (upper panel), a high spatial frequency (lower left panel) and  low spatial frequency stimuli (lower right panel). The high spatial frequency component of the hybrid can be seen more easily if you hold the image close to your eyes, and the low spatial frequency information can be better seen if you step away from the image or slightly blur your gaze.

b) Results with hybrid faces. The ANOVA confirmed that patients used more frequently LSF than healthy controls. The ANOVA on HSF showed a similar result.

c) Performance of healthy controls and patients on filtered faces. The ANOVA showed a main effect of spatial frequency, indicating that both patients and controls were more accurate with high spatial frequency faces. There was no frequency × group interaction

(from Laprévote V, Oliva A, Delerue C, Thomas P, Boucart M. Patients with schizophrenia are biased toward low spatial frequency to decode facial expression at a glance. Neuropsychologia. 2010 Dec;48(14):4164-8)

5 selected publications:

  • Jardri R, Cachia A, Thomas P & Pins D. The neuroscience of hallucinations. Springer (NY): 2012, in press.
  • Jardri R, Pouchet A, Pins D, Thomas P. Cortical activations during auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia: a coordinate-based meta-analysis. Am J Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;168(1):73-81.
  • Laprévote V, Oliva A, Delerue C, Thomas P, Boucart M. Patients with schizophrenia are biased toward low spatial frequency to decode facial expression at a glance. Neuropsychologia. 2010 Dec;48(14):4164-8.
  • Ducato MG, Michael GA, Thomas P, Despretz P, Monestes JL, Loas G, Boucart M. Attentional capture in schizophrenia: failure to resist interference from motion signals. Cogn Neuropsychiatry. 2008 May;13(3):185-209.
  • Jardri R, Lucas B, Delevoye-Turrell Y, Delmaire C, Delion P, Thomas P, Goeb JL. An 11-year-old boy with drug-resistant schizophrenia treated with temporo-parietal rTMS. Mol Psychiatry. 2007 Apr;12(4):320.